A Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue ePUB ´

A Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue ePUB ´ The many vulgar allusions and cant expressions that so frequently occur in our common conversation and periodical publications, make a work of this kind extremely useful, if not absolutely necessary, not only to foreigners, but even to native residents at a distance from the metropolis, or who do not mix in the busy world without some such help, they might hunt through all the ordinary dictionaries, from Alpha to Omega, in search of the words, black legs, lame duck, a plumb, malingeror, nip cheese, darbies, and the new drop, although these are all terms of well known import, at New market, Exchange alley, the City, the Parade, Wapping, and Newgate The fashionable words, or favorite expressions of the day, also find their way into our political and theatrical compositions these, as they generally originate from some trifling event, or temporary circumstance, on falling into disuse, or being superseded by new ones, vanish without a trace behind, such were the late fashionable words, a Bore and a Twaddle, among the great vulgar, Maccaroni and the Barber, among the small these too are here carefully registered Another excellent reference work for writers of historical fiction and readers too. Just a little napsometimes you need a stiff drinkpity David s sow Just a little napsometimes you need a stiff drinkpity David s sow I love slang modern hipster slang, Victorian criminal cant, Roger Melly s Profanisaurus This is a fab dictionary of vulgar slang from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, which shows how colourful and vibrant the English language has always been. Wonderful, and wonderfully vulgar in both senses A mother lode for those writing historical fiction in the English of the latter half of the 18th and early 19th centuries A Rabelaisian hoot for pretty much everybody else I found my copy remaindered, but Project Gutenberg makes it available at And I forgot to mention, the author s name is Francis Grose Perfect Wonderful, and wonderfully vulgar in both senses A mother lode for those writing historical fiction in the English of the latter half of the 18th and early 19th centuries A Rabelaisian hoot for pretty much everybody else I found my copy remaindered, but Project Gutenberg makes it available at And I forgot to mention, the author s name is Francis Grose Perfect

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