They Called Us Enemy PDF Á They Called PDF/EPUB or

They Called Us Enemy PDF Á They Called  PDF/EPUB or I couldn t reconcile what I read in these books about the shining ideas of our democracy with what I knew to be my childhood imprisonment What can I even say Everyone should read this book I am becoming a big fan of these graphic novel memoirs, and George Takei s look at his childhood imprisonment inside an American concentration camp might be the most powerful yet It succeeds wonderfully and horrifically on several levels It acts as a reminder of a shameful time in America s history a I couldn t reconcile what I read in these books about the shining ideas of our democracy with what I knew to be my childhood imprisonment What can I even say Everyone should read this book I am becoming a big fan of these graphic novel memoirs, and George Takei s look at his childhood imprisonment inside an American concentration camp might be the most powerful yet It succeeds wonderfully and horrifically on several levels It acts as a reminder of a shameful time in America s history a time so terrifyingly recent It offers far too many parallels with the present day, cautioning us against how very easy it is to turn a neighbour into an other into an enemy.It is also just a portrait of a childhood, and this might be what truly stuck the knife in my heart and made this read so absolutely devastating Takei recalls being a young boy and feeling, at first, like he and his family were going on an adventure Not understanding his parents fear and humiliation, but just trying to play games, run around, and be human in a country that was determined to see him as something else.It is tough to read, but absolutely necessary Also his parents were fucking heroes.Blog Facebook Twitter Instagram Youtube A graphic memoir recounting actor author activist George Takei s childhood imprisoned within American concentration camps during World War II Experience the forces that shaped an American icon and America itselfLong before George Takei braved new frontiers in Star Trek, he woke up as a four year old boy to find his own birth country at war with his father s and their entire family forced from their home into an uncertain futureIn , at the order of President Franklin D Roosevelt, every person of Japanese descent on the west coast was rounded up and shipped to one of ten relocation centers, hundreds or thousands of miles from home, where they would be held for years under armed guard They Called Us Enemy is Takei s firsthand account of those years behind barbed wire, the joys and terrors of growing up under legalized racism, his mother s hard choices, his father s faith in democracy, and the way those experiences planted the seeds for his astonishing future George Takei played a relatively minor character, Sulu, in the first iteration of Star Trek which ended far too soon Years later, many people got to watch this show in endless reruns, and he, with the rest of the cast, became famous to new generations Takei has become evenfamous as a social activist and humorist on social media, which opened up the possibility for him to use his fame to speak widely on behalf of a variety of social causes including gay rights , and develop a Broadway pe George Takei played a relatively minor character, Sulu, in the first iteration of Star Trek which ended far too soon Years later, many people got to watch this show in endless reruns, and he, with the rest of the cast, became famous to new generations Takei has become evenfamous as a social activist and humorist on social media, which opened up the possibility for him to use his fame to speak widely on behalf of a variety of social causes including gay rights , and develop a Broadway performance based on his life This book is basically another version of his life with a focus on his having grown up imprisoned in a Japanese internment camp for a few years from the time he was four years old.In 1942, at the order of President Franklin D Roosevelt, every person of Japanese descent on the west coast was rounded up and shipped to one of ten relocation centers, and seen as enemies of the state Unlike now, where we separate refugee families into separate camps, the Japanese Americans in these camps were allowed to stay together, and Takei s drew closer as a family, but this unacceptable and shameful practice nevertheless became a scar in American history.I have been reviewing other books focused on the internment, but this was developed from Takei s life story by two writers and illustrated as a kind of graphic memoir, with teens and possibly younger students as intended audience It s an inspirational story, and should be read widely, again using his fame as a way to address a shameful period in American history, issues that are ongoing in American life, and in other countries as well The art is okay, the adapted story is okay, I d say 3 stars, but I bump it up to 4 stars for the timely topic and because I hope it will be used in schools and read by young people everywhere Even if I hadn t loved it, I d have found it impossible to give less than five stars to such a powerful and important book as this But I did I loved every single page. I did know about the Japanese internment camps I didn t think much else about that other than the blight on our country George Takei has taken his story, he lived through the entire internment process, and he has made an excellent story out of his life When I am able to see what it was like, it outrages me and horrifies me It seems to stupid now, putting people in camps because they are from Japan I m so glad that George has a good story The whole thing was so humiliating for all involved I did know about the Japanese internment camps I didn t think much else about that other than the blight on our country George Takei has taken his story, he lived through the entire internment process, and he has made an excellent story out of his life When I am able to see what it was like, it outrages me and horrifies me It seems to stupid now, putting people in camps because they are from Japan I m so glad that George has a good story The whole thing was so humiliating for all involved and there were some dirty tricks played on these people My favorite part of the story is at the end George is giving a talk and he remembers his fathers words George is older and his dad tells him stories about the camps that George didn t remember George thinks his father would hate or at least be angry with American and he says Of all the forms of government that we have, American democracy is still the best Roosevelt pulled us out of the depression and he did great things but he was also a fallible human being and he made a disastrous mistake that affected us calamitously Despite all we ve experienced, our democracy is still the best in the world because it s a people s democracy and the people can do great things Reading that line just gave me chills These people suffered for four years and to see that still is from a wise and powerful person I feel like I understand what happened here better and I m so glad that George shared his story with us It s an important story The writing is a bit dry, but it s totally worth the read if you are interested in our countries history, mistakes and good deeds George writes true and fair This Review Blog Twitter Instagram I have discovered this book through the GR choice awards this year I have read many good graphic novel this year and I think this one should win because it is important forpeople to read it I am not a fan of historical books but this year, I have been learning much history through graphic novels and lighter novels I read much about the Jew concentration camps but this story is a bit different It talks about the American concentration camps This Review Blog Twitter Instagram I have discovered this book through the GR choice awards this year I have read many good graphic novel this year and I think this one should win because it is important forpeople to read it I am not a fan of historical books but this year, I have been learning much history through graphic novels and lighter novels I read much about the Jew concentration camps but this story is a bit different It talks about the American concentration camps for the Japanese people and I never thought of this before and it was such an eye opening book There are 2 choices that were smart regarding this book, that the main character was a kid and the artist did a great job with the black and white illustrations I think it succeeded in capturing the vibes of the story so well Not to mention that the artist had a very simple, clean and accurate art style The kids always make this kind of stories lighter for me but sadder and there is just something great in reading about their innocence and that war is always a bad choice I don t have much to say about this but if you have a few hours to spare, then this is a great book for sure and I hope it wins the GR awards although I am certain it won t Summary an important story with great art style, great characters and an important message Read it if you like graphic novels and historical books.You can getbooks from Book Depository On February 19, 1942, seventy four days after the attack on Pearl HarborPresident Franklin Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066 The order never used the word Japanese or camps it authorized the military to declare areas from which any or all persons may be excludedas for what kind of persons would be excluded, that quickly became obviouspages 22 and 23Actor George Takei best known for his role as Sulu in the durable Star Trek TV and film franchise teamsOn February 19, 1942, seventy four days after the attack on Pearl HarborPresident Franklin Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066 The order never used the word Japanese or camps it authorized the military to declare areas from which any or all persons may be excludedas for what kind of persons would be excluded, that quickly became obviouspages 22 and 23Actor George Takei best known for his role as Sulu in the durable Star Trek TV and film franchise teams with writers Justin Eisinger and Steven Scott plus illustrator Harmony Becker to present his childhood experiences in the historical sociological graphic novel They Called Us Enemy Drawn in stark black and white, the book mostly details the four years 1942 to 1946 when Takei and his family father, mother, brother and sister all American born, except for the father who was a respected and successful small business owner in Los Angeles were relocated to imprisoned in internment camps with tens of thousands of other Japanese Americans for the duration of WWII.It is a timely, affecting story It also taps into a certain dark fear whether as a child as Takei was at the time or an adult his parents , life irreversibly being turned upside down by forces beyond your control is something that frightens or should frighten all of us, even if we don t care to really admit it I certainly don t want to imagine simultaneously losing my job, my house property, and my rights.Also of note is that Takei drops in a few moments of humor better to laugh than cry, right that he recalls amidst this depressing situation, and much later instead of becoming an angry or resentful adult he channels said experiences memories into his at first unplanned role as an activist He also briefly shines a light on the U.S Army s 442nd regimental combat team comprised of Japanese Americans, it was one of the most decorated units in the military during WWII These men fought with valor, possibly because they understood better than anyone what they were really fighting for Well done, George Takei and, of course, kudos to the co authors and artists , and thank you for using your frankly, enormous reputation OK, let s put it out there, from Star Trek to advance the common good generally, and specifically, at this time of society and our fragile nation.So, where to start Yes, yes, it s a graphic novel, but it s much, much It s non fiction, it s autobiographical, it s current, it s important, it s historic, it s informative, and and, yes, as graphic Well done, George Takei and, of course, kudos to the co authors and artists , and thank you for using your frankly, enormous reputation OK, let s put it out there, from Star Trek to advance the common good generally, and specifically, at this time of society and our fragile nation.So, where to start Yes, yes, it s a graphic novel, but it s much, much It s non fiction, it s autobiographical, it s current, it s important, it s historic, it s informative, and and, yes, as graphic novels go or as these types of autobiographical efforts go , it s quite good, and it s highly accessible, and he s obviously a celebrity, so it s getting a lot of coverage including a massive spread in this weekend s Washington Post so it s a powerful tool OK, it won t be all things to all people Depending upon the circles you run in particularly among people who read literature I might recommend even though it s fiction that folks who want an empathetic introduction to the Japanese Internment debacle instead start with Julie Otsuka s When the Emperor Was Divine appreciating that, Otsuka s book is fiction, and very much micro, and Takei s, frankly, is not only personal yet macro, but alsoinformative or fact rich Having said that, particularly with his springboard, it s a solid piece of work, and the timing couldn t be better To the extent this is a graphic novel, I expect that many folks will immediately make analogies to Art Spiegelman s iconic Maus, but I fear that it s a tough comparison for Maus, many stars aligned, and timing coming at the tale end of the late 1980 s early 1990 s birth rebirth of adult graphic novels think, I dunno, Kingdom Come, Sandman, Dark Knight Returns, Watchmen, etc was a big part of it Rather than Maus, I immediately thought of Marjane Satrapi s similarly powerful Persopolis, which I found to be quite good and thought provoking and emotive Heck, you might also want to throw Max Brooks informative and well done Harlem Hellfighters onto that pile But let s be clear, graphic novels can be a very effective tool for opening people s eyes to facts and ideas that may not previously have been familiar, or come to grips, with But, drifting to non graphic non fiction books that humanize the country s less than flattering, OK, heinous history of racial oppression, it was interesting to read this immediately after finishing Michael Kranish s very recent and quite good The World s Fastest Man, about America s First Black Sports Hero, in my review of that one, I suggested that, the book s primary contribution may be helping some folks cyclists sports fanatics to gain familiarity with our oft ignored history of race and racism In that context, thinking about other excellent examples of compelling non fiction on race, I might comfortably shelve that book alongside Isabel Wilkerson s monumental Warmth of Other Suns, Gilbert King s Pulitzer Prize winning Devil in the Grove, or maybe even David Grann s stunning Killers of the Flower Moon, but, of course, these are all just the tip of the iceberg.At the end of the day, I recommend the book without hesitation It s a quick read Buy it, share it, pass it on to kids in school not just college or high school I think it would play well in middle and junior high schools , friends, neighbors, potential voters, and generally open minded people and potential voters who, for whatever reason, may simply be unfamiliar with the history of race in the U.S particularly between the Civil War and the 1960 s Civil Rights Movement Oh, and, if you re on Twitter, follow the author at GeorgeTakei his voice is a unique and refreshing one in these troubling times I can t wait to read this George Takei, who was Sulu of Star Trek, relates his childhood of being imprisoned during World War II by the U.S government for around three years After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, approximately 120,000 of Japanese ancestry, who were living along the West coast regardless of U.S citizenship or that they had never been to Japan, were either arrested or incarcerated in relocation centers They were forced to abandon their homes, jobs, and possessions It was believed that they were loyal to t George Takei, who was Sulu of Star Trek, relates his childhood of being imprisoned during World War II by the U.S government for around three years After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, approximately 120,000 of Japanese ancestry, who were living along the West coast regardless of U.S citizenship or that they had never been to Japan, were either arrested or incarcerated in relocation centers They were forced to abandon their homes, jobs, and possessions It was believed that they were loyal to the Japanese emperor simply because of their ancestry and that they could not be assimilated Yet, the American Germans were never subjected to this same atrocity This illustrated memoir depicts his family s and the other detainees struggles and choices against this legalized racism It is a stark reminder that injustices, whether legalized or not, have and continue to occur because of discrimination

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